Faculty Research Mentors



Stefan Balaz, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair of the Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences-Vermont Campus
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences
(802) 735-2615 | stefan.balaz@acphs.edu

Research in Dr. Balaz’s laboratory is oriented towards the development of experimental and computational methods for structure-based predictions of the rate and extent of processes which determine drug disposition and receptor binding. One of the goals of the research is to find ways to tailor drug structures to reduce the cytotoxicity of drugs, such as those used for treatment of some cancers or arthritis.


Charles Bergeron, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Program Affiliations: M.S. in Molecular Biosciences, M.S. in Health Outcomes Research, M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences
(518) 694-7141 | charles.bergeron@acphs.edu

Dr. Bergeron exploits mathematics, statistics, optimization and algorithms to discover interesting properties in datasets and generates models that generalize well to new samples. Current projects include optimizing the dose in radiotherapy cancer treatment planning and modeling various aspects of the drug design process.


Mehdi Boroujerdi, Ph.D.

Professor of Pharmaceutics
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences
(518) 694-7140 | mehdi.boroujerdi@acphs.edu

The focus of Dr. Boroujerdi's current research project is to investigate the influence of modulation of ATP-dependent efflux proteins, P-glycoprotein (Pgp), on the uptake, accumulation and disposition of xenobiotics and their metabolites in pancreatic cancer. The ultimate goal is to seek strategies to improve pancreatic cancer patients’ responses to chemotherapy.


Richard E. Dearborn, Jr., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences
(518) 694-7387 | richard.dearborn@acphs.edu

Dr. Dearborn’s research focuses on development neurobiology in the fruit fly (Drosophila) in three primary areas: 1) The elucidation of vitamin D3 up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1) tumor suppressor function during brain development; 2) Hedgehog (Hh)-dependent regulation of VDUP1 in cell proliferation; and 3) Molecular characterization of Eph receptor signaling pathways.


Hassan A.N. El-Fawal, Ph. D.

Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
(518) 694-7137 | hassan.el-fawal@acphs.edu
Program Affiliations: M.S. in Pharm. Sciences, M.S. in Health Outcomes Research

Dr. El-Fawal’s main research is focused in two broad areas: neurodegenerative and cardiopulmonary diseases. In particular, the Neurotoxicology laboratory is interested in the contribution of environmental chemicals - pesticides, heavy metals and solvents - to neurodegenerative disorders. The laboratory is also exploring the pulmonary and nervous system toxicity of ambient ultrafine particles and man-made nanoparticles.


Tamer Fandy, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
(802) 735-2634 | tamer.fandy@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Fandy's laboratory is involved in both basic and translational research in the field of molecular epigenetics. Specifically, his lab seeks to understand the mechanisms of action of the DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors and how they induce clinical remission in hematological malignancies, examining questions such as can we predict who will respond to the drugs and can we make the therapy more effective?


Carlos Feleder, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
(518) 694-7230 | carlos.feleder@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Feleder has a long-standing interest in uncovering the mechanisms underlying the body's response to immune challenges, i.e., how the central nervous system controls the physiologic functions that protect the body from the harmful effects of infectious agents.


Karen C. Glass, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
(802) 735-2636 | karen.glass@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Glass's research uses numerous biochemical, molecular biology, and biophysical techniques to investigate the structure and functional role of chromatin reader domains in biological processes and in disease. Dr. Glass is currently engaged in a three-year NIH research grant that is seeking to identify new ways to prevent and treat Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML).


Martha A. Hass, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and Dean, School of Graduate Studies
(518) 694-7238 | martha.hass@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Hass’ research integrates synthetic organic chemistry, pharmaceutical formulation and stability, biochemical assays, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacology. Her laboratory provides unique training opportunities for research students in the areas of drug synthesis, pharmaceutical formulation, topical drug delivery and assessment of drug efficacy.


Arnold Johnson, Ph.D.

Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
(518) 694-7128 | arnie.johnson@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Johnson's primary research interest is the study of inflammation-mediated organ dysfunction. His research focuses on the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema, a major cause of death and disability during systemic inflammation and septic shock. Specifically, Dr. Johnson investigates the role of the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-a, in the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema and lung dysfunction.


Arcadius V. Krivoshein, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Basic and Social Sciences
(518) 694-7214 | arcadius.krivoshein@acphs.edu
Program Affiliations: M.S. in Molecular Biosciences, M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Krivoshein’s research interests lie in the areas of mechanistic biochemistry and molecular pharmacology. His lab recently discovered that compounds containing an α-substituted amide group produce their antiepileptic effect at least in part by inhibiting the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. An interdisciplinary approach combining rapid chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, chiral HPLC, and x-ray diffraction is being used to elucidate the mechanism of action of these drugs.


Robert M. Levin, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus
(518) 694-7306 | robert.levin@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Levin's principal areas of research are lower urinary tract physiology, pharmacology, and pathology with emphasis on urinary bladder dysfunction associated with BPH in men, and recurrent urinary tract infection and incontinence in women. His lab's studies are focused on correlating obstructive bladder dysfunction with ischemia/reperfusion and the resultant pathological processes.


Susan M. Ludeman, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Chemistry
(518) 694-7153 | susan.ludeman@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Research in Dr. Ludeman’s lab is based on the application of synthetic and physical organic chemistry to investigations of drug design, metabolism, and delivery. One of her lab's current projects involves the synthesis and evaluation of a new class of drugs designed for targeted delivery to neuroblastoma and pheochromocytoma.


Meenakshi Malik, D.V.M., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Basic and Social Sciences
(518) 694-7168 | meenakshi.malik@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences, M.S. in Molecular Biosciences

The long term research goal of Dr. Malik’s laboratory is to understand the host mediated mechanisms of innate immunity against intracellular bacterial pathogens. Over the past several years, her research has focused on elucidating the many complexities of innate immunity against Francisella tularensis, a category A biothreat agent.


Darius Mason, Pharm.D., BCPS

Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
(518) 694-7188 | darius.mason@acphs.edu
Program Affiliations: M.S. in Molecular Biosciences, M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Mason’s research interests are focused evaluation of pharmacotherapy on vascular calcification markers in chronic kidney disease, Vitamin D, and phosphorus metabolism in healthy and chronic kidney disease and biomarkers of neurology in chronic kidney disease.


William R. Millington, Ph.D.

Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
(518) 694-7242 | william.millington@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Millington's research focuses on the function of opioid peptide neurons in mammalian brain and their role in pain perception, cardiovascular regulation, and addiction. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop novel treatments for the adverse effects of opiate analgesics, particularly addiction.


Shaker A. Mousa, Ph.D., MBA, FACC, FACB

Professor, Vice Provost for Research
Chairman of ACPHS Pharmaceutical Research Institute
(518) 694-7397 | shaker.mousa@acphs.edu
Program Affiliations: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences, M.S. in Molecular Biosciences, M.S. in Health Outcomes Research

Dr. Mousa uses enabling technologies that include nanotechnology, biotechnology, and stem cells as key catalysts in the discovery of novel therapeutics and diagnostics for the treatment and prevention of various diseases including cancer, cardiovascular, neurological, ophthalmological, inflammatory, and other vascular disorders.


Marcel Musteata, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
(518) 694-7883 | marcel.musteata@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Musteata's research interests include the development of miniaturized analytical technology for pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic drug monitoring, with the purpose of creating personalized therapeutic devices that integrate chemical analysis, decision, and drug delivery.


Anthony M. Nicasio, Pharm.D.

Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
(518) 694-7324 | anthony.nicasio@acphs.edu
Program Affiliations: M.S. in Molecular Biosciences, M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Nicasio’s research focuses on ways of optimizing antibiotic efficacy when used to treat prevalent multidrug resistant bacterial infections. Specifically, he utilizes various experimental methodologies to evaluate the impact that antibiotic dosing strategies have on the rate and extent of bacterial kill, the development of antibiotic resistance, and the survival of the patient.


Wendy M. Parker, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Basic and Social Sciences
(518) 694-7361 | wendy.parker@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Health Outcomes Research

Dr. Parker’s research interests span the fields of health and health care, family, and social policy, examining the causes of social inequalities throughout the life course. Recent work has examined the inequalities in child health trajectories connected to parental resources, as well as a project related to the health of military women.


John M. Polimeni, PhD.

Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
(518) 694-7384 | john.polimeni@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Health Outcomes Research

Dr. Polimeni's current research interests include healthcare financing in developing countries, energy efficiency and sustainability, economic development, transitional economies, transdisciplinary/ecological economics, transportation economics, and sustainable agriculture.


Binshan Shi, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Health Sciences
(518) 694-7116 | Binshan.Shi@acphs.edu
Program Affiliations: M.S. in Molecular Biosciences, M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Shi's lab seeks to understand the molecular basis of disease pathogenesis by using advanced molecular biology, virology, molecular genetics, and bioinformatics approaches. Another major area of interest in the lab is the design and development of nucleic acid-based molecular diagnosis assays for detecting infectious diseases.


Markus Stein, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Health Sciences
(518) 694-7174 | markus.stein@acphs.edu
Program Affiliations: M.S. in Molecular Biosciences, M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Stein's major research interest is to understand the complex interactions between the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori and the eukaryotic cells. Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of several gastric diseases including peptic ulcer disease (PUD), MALT-lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma.


Jeffrey M. Voigt, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
(518) 694-7308 | jeffrey.voigt@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

VDUP-1 (TBP-2) is a protein whose expression is decreased in tumors and increased following treatment with Vitamin D. Dr. Voigt is currently investigating the role of VDUP-1 in the regulation of transcription factor activity and cell proliferation/differentiation in different cell types.


Eric Yager, Ph.D

Assistant Professor of Basic and Social Sciences
(518) 694-7110 | eric.yager@acphs.edu
Program Affiliation: M.S. in Molecular Biosciences

Dr. Yager is testing the hypothesis that biological aging adversely impacts the ability of the NLRP3 inflammasome to properly regulate inflammation and host defense. Results from this work have the potential to facilitate the identification of new drug targets for the effective treatment of chronic inflammation and/or the development of new vaccination strategies for the elderly population.